Tag Archives: Scotland

Scottish Government release latest Delivery Plan for perinatal and infant mental health

By Joanne Smith, Everyone’s Business Scotland Coordinator

The Maternal Mental Health Alliance’s (MMHA) Everyone’s Business campaign welcomes publication of the Scottish Government’s perinatal mental health delivery plan.

We commend the level of ambition, and ongoing commitment to strengthen and improve services across the pathway, including the third sector which has been a lifeline for many women and families, particularly during lock down. Continue reading Scottish Government release latest Delivery Plan for perinatal and infant mental health

Catherine’s story

What the staff at the mother and baby unit did was help me pick up the pieces of my life and put them back together.

Catherine’s story (Scotland)

I didn’t realise I was ill. I put things down to sleep deprivation, the shock of becoming a new mum and an infection I’d developed after the C-section. I thought all these things together probably explained why I felt a little bit off.

But things started to get a lot worse. I truly believed my baby had been swapped at birth. And I even believed road signs were tailored messages for me. I saw a sign which said, “Please observe at all times”, and I thought it was telling everybody else they should be observing me.

Putting my life back together

Five months after the birth of Beatrix I was diagnosed with postpartum psychosis. This led to me being treated for six weeks at the mother and baby psychiatric unit (MBU) at St John’s hospital, Livingston. After which I was admitted one more time.

What the staff at the MBU did was help me pick up the pieces of my life and put them back together. I’d completely lost my confidence as a mother and felt like I couldn’t be trusted to be alone with Bea. But they helped to rebuild my confidence, and so did my mum and husband after I was discharged.

Treatable with the right support

I think it’s really easy for mums to think everything is their fault when things don’t go to plan following the birth of a child. You think you must be a bad mum in some way, but obviously that’s not true at all when someone is struggling with postpartum psychosis.

It’s a treatable illness like any other – like diabetes. People just need to be supported through it. They need access to mother and baby units; and they need to feel okay about seeking out this support, which means tackling the stigma still associated with maternal mental health problems.

 


If the content of this story causes you to think of anything that has happened to you or someone you know and you feel upset, worried or uncomfortable, please see our support page for a list of services who may be able to help.

Perinatal mental health services more important now than ever as we emerge from the pandemic

Think piece by Joanne Smith, Everyone’s Business Scotland Coordinator

On World Maternal Mental Health Day, the time is right to reflect on the progress made in Scotland to protect pregnant women, new mums and their babies during the perinatal period.
 

While there have been encouraging signs of progress following the establishment of the perinatal managed clinical network and the perinatal and infant mental health programme board, the levels of specialist provision still falls short in most parts of the country, meaning right now, women and families still face a postcode lottery.

Continue reading Perinatal mental health services more important now than ever as we emerge from the pandemic

Gill’s story

I want to let other mums know that they’re not alone in how they feel, that they and their mental health matter, and they deserve to be well and happy.

Gill’s story (Aberdeenshire)

Postnatal post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is under recognised and under discussed. Many women find childbirth traumatic but have few outlets for these feelings and little opportunity to talk about their experiences, as the prevailing opinion seems to be “a healthy baby is all that matters”.

I want to let other mums know that they’re not alone in how they feel, that they and their mental health matter, and they deserve to be well and happy.

Finally diagnosed correctly

It was five months after the birth of my daughter that I finally admitted that I needed help. Originally, I was misdiagnosed with postnatal depression and prescribed anti-depressant medication. As I disagreed with the diagnosis, I did not take the medication and pressed for a second opinion.

After the subsequent assessment, I was told I had a complex PTSD and referred to a psychologist. It was only then, more than one year after giving birth to my daughter, that I started to receive the specialist perinatal mental health support I needed.

Rural location creates challenges

My psychological treatment was incredibly helpful. I took part in talking therapy, had EMDR (eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing) and Schema therapy. But I do despair that it took so long to access the right support for me.

In part, I think this is due to living in rural Aberdeenshire. As well as NHS services being stretched, we are also underserved by the third sector and in addition can’t easily connect with peer support services.   

I’m lucky, I eventually received the right perinatal treatment, but some women aren’t even being diagnosed. This is why I share my story; to raise awareness that perinatal mental health problems can happen to anyone and call for better specialist support.

 

If the content of this story causes you to think of anything that has happened to you or someone you know and you feel upset, worried or uncomfortable, please see our support page for a list of services who may be able to help.

Implementing PIMH funding in Scotland: opportunities and risks

Blog by Clare Thompson, Everyone’s Business Co-ordinator for Scotland

In this article, I will discuss the recent work done by the Perinatal and Infant Mental Health (PIMH) Implementation Programme Board, the meetings of which I attend in my capacity as a Change Agent for Maternal Mental Health Scotland and an Everyone’s Business champion. Continue reading Implementing PIMH funding in Scotland: opportunities and risks

Positive steps taken in Scotland to improve access to inpatient care

In 2015, the Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland carried out a themed visit to find out how many women received care in a local adult acute ward, without their baby, during a period of perinatal mental illness. They found that just over one third of women were separated from their baby, sometimes for a prolonged period. In Scotland, it is a legal duty for Health Boards to provide joint mother and baby admissions. Continue reading Positive steps taken in Scotland to improve access to inpatient care

First Minister announces more than £50m funding boost for perinatal and infant mental health services

On 6th March, First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, and Minister for Mental Health, Clare Haughey, visited the mother and baby unit (MBU) at St John’s Hospital in Livingston, Scotland, where they announced that more than £50m is to be spent on improving access to perinatal mental health (PMH) services.

Following the funding announcement, the National Managed Clinical Network (MCN) for PMH launched their needs assessment report, funded by the Scottish Government, and Women and Families Maternal Mental Health Pledge, which was developed in partnership with Maternal Mental Health Scotland Change Agents.

Continue reading First Minister announces more than £50m funding boost for perinatal and infant mental health services

Hazel’s story

Everyone throughout the UK should have access to the services they need, no matter what their postcode is.

Hazel’s story (Falkirk)

Following the birth of my second baby, I experienced postnatal depression. But in the Fife area, where I was living at the time, there were no services to support me. After I asked my GP for help, I was given anti-depressants and sent away. The effect of this was that my attachment to my son suffered and I struggled with mental health problems for the next six years.

When I had my third child, everything was different. As I was now living in the Forth Valley, and was registered as high risk, I was supported by a great health visitor and NHS Forth Valley’s perinatal mental health team, and I could easily access Aberlour Perinatal Befriending Support Service.

A different experience

Aberlour basically changed my life. I built up a great relationship with a befriender, who I trusted 100%. She helped to boost my confidence as a parent, showed me it was okay to talk about my worries, and provided me with lots of practical mental health tips. I also found talking through things with the perinatal mental health team a huge help, and they provided me with coping strategies.

Having access to these wonderful services means my mental health has improved a lot. I now have a great attachment to my children, and life, in general, is not as much of a struggle as it was.

Equal access for all

I do know, though, that I only got the care and support I needed because I’d moved to the Forth Valley – a situation that isn’t right. I think everyone throughout the UK should have access to the services they need, no matter what their postcode is.

Much more must be done to make perinatal mental health teams available in people’s local areas. Maternity staff, GPs, health visitors and nurses all need to be educated more about perinatal mental health, the signs to look out for, and who they should refer women and their families to. These steps would change so many lives.

 

If the content of this story causes you to think of anything that has happened to you or someone you know and you feel upset, worried or uncomfortable, please see our support page for a list of services who may be able to help.

Clare’s story

I couldn’t sleep, even when the baby slept, and during my daughter’s ninth week of life I didn’t sleep for three nights in a row. At this point, my community psychiatric nurse suggested, “A wee stay in the mother and baby unit”.

Clare’s story (Glasgow)

During my pregnancy with my daughter, I felt very little – no excitement, no anticipation, no fear. I was mildly concerned about this, so I mentioned it to my midwife, who referred me to my local perinatal mental health service. There, a community psychiatric nurse (CPN) helped me understand that I didn’t have to be excited but made it clear that support would be available after the birth, if I needed it.

I felt no peace

My labour was long, and eventually I had an emergency caesarean. This experience, coupled with the total shock of being responsible for this little human, meant I quickly became very anxious and hypervigilant. As a result, I couldn’t sleep, even when the baby slept, and during my daughter’s ninth week of life I didn’t sleep for three nights in a row. At this point, my CPN suggested, “A wee stay in the mother and baby unit”.

At the unit, I lived from hour-to-hour, taking medicine, doing baby massage, going for walks and talking to the nurses about the journey I was on. I also had visits home, but I found these terrifying. Although I didn’t want to be in the unit, I didn’t want to be home too. I didn’t want to be anywhere. I felt peace nowhere.

Fabulous, ongoing support

After five weeks, I finally did go home, which was followed by a year of care from the community team at the perinatal mental health service. This involved weekly visits from a CPN, who offered me lots of reassurance and talked about what I wanted to talk about. All of these things allowed me to build a relationship with my daughter, which is so precious to me now.

Today, six years on, I’m extremely thankful for the fabulous care I received from the perinatal mental health team at NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde. My positive experience is something I’d like to use to help other women and families because across Scotland there is a huge disparity in perinatal mental health services. I hope that the promised funding for perinatal and infant mental health services in Scotland will make a big difference to women and families.

 

If the content of this story causes you to think of anything that has happened to you or someone you know and you feel upset, worried or uncomfortable, please see our support page for a list of services who may be able to help.